It won’t burn coal any more
Instead, the power plant will run on biomass
The old coal plant hasn’t been used in a while. Now, a New York energy company plans to buy it and make it run on wood - including the tree parts left behind by foresters.
The project is expected to cost more than $30 million and bring lots of jobs to Watertown, New York.
The locals are pretty excited
  [photo: sustainablesushi.net]

It won’t burn coal any more

Instead, the power plant will run on biomass

The old coal plant hasn’t been used in a while. Now, a New York energy company plans to buy it and make it run on wood - including the tree parts left behind by foresters.

The project is expected to cost more than $30 million and bring lots of jobs to Watertown, New York.

The locals are pretty excited

  [photo: sustainablesushi.net]

“Why are we paying their bills and funding their oppression? Today there’s a better way, ethical oil from Canada’s oil sands”

advert run by the Canadian energy industry, arguing they will help free US consumers from reliance on petroleum from the Middle East.

"Canada is an an interesting place. And it needs to decide whether its economic future lies in being a petro-state – in the long run, petro-states don’t end happily. That’s the story if you look around the world."

-Bill McKibben, author, biologist and environmental activist

The rub: in the Northeast, one of every six American homes and businesses is now powered by Canadian electricity.

And there is a loud clamor among politicians, businesses and pundits to get much more energy from north of the border.

The cost, ecological and economic, is staggering

There’s less natural gas here than we thought
Department of Energy drastically reduces estimates of natural gas reserves in Marcellus shale.
Hear more on NCPR
  [map: david quintana]

There’s less natural gas here than we thought

Department of Energy drastically reduces estimates of natural gas reserves in Marcellus shale.

Hear more on NCPR

  [map: david quintana]

Both sides, on North Country Public Radio this morning

After New York shuts the door on public comments about hydro-fracking, opponents of gas drilling want more time to voice their complaints. Drillers want to get at it already.

In a related story, a new Brookings report says New York’s approach to clean energy is paying off.

Hm. That’s like three sides. At least. Hear all of them.

  [dtxmcclain: Bulova clock radio, 1964]

Tilting away from turbines, toward fracking
Ohio state politics lean toward hydrofacking and away from what could be the first major offshore wind project in the Great Lakes. Hear more
  [photo: David Sommerstein]

Tilting away from turbines, toward fracking

Ohio state politics lean toward hydrofacking and away from what could be the first major offshore wind project in the Great Lakes. Hear more

  [photo: David Sommerstein]

The rural-urban divide - a power line runs through it
Now, Governor Cuomo plans devoting $2 Billion to modernize the conduit carrying Quebec hydro power to NYC. So, if the North Country is a kind of energy thruway, do we get any of that money? Or should we set up a toll booth?
Radio, yes. City? The opposite, really. Hear this story here.
  [photo: flexomatic.com]

The rural-urban divide - a power line runs through it

Now, Governor Cuomo plans devoting $2 Billion to modernize the conduit carrying Quebec hydro power to NYC. So, if the North Country is a kind of energy thruway, do we get any of that money? Or should we set up a toll booth?

Radio, yes. City? The opposite, really. Hear this story here.

  [photo: flexomatic.com]